The Effect of Music on Teens

Daisy Valentin, Columnist

Music can be a very good way for teens to express themselves, but it can also be a huge distraction. It can occasionally be abused, and can make the students forget about what is important. According to the Huffington Post, nearly two-thirds of U.S. teenagers under the age of 18 say they use Google Inc.’s video-sharing site to listen to music.  When it comes to focusing on school work, however, music shouldn’t be a distraction.  Students who spend their time on music should use it as a form of education as well as something fun. Why not connect both music and education and come up with an easier and more entertaining way to learn?

I remember back in 6th and 7th grade I thought my science teacher was completely strange because she always had these weird songs and dances we would do to learn different topics. I thought she looked like a crazy lady jumping around the room. However, when it came to a test or a quiz, I found that I knew what I was talking about because of her songs.

Other students feel that certain types of music help them concentrate and focus better. Joy Pizorno, grade 9, feels that the music that distracts her more than anything is rock or heavy metal. “I prefer listening to Classical music or show tunes,” Joy Pizorno stated. Mary Steward, grade 9, feels that classical and jazz help her focus much more on school work. They both believe that music needs to be calm and relaxing in order for them to concentrate and get their work done, so when students are doing homework, they should try concentrating by  listening to music that soothes and relaxes them. And in order to remember certain material, students can maybe come up with a fun song or tune to remember the material.