NJHS: A Beneficial Preparation

On right, NJHS president Maggie Kenzler and Emily LaBatt, NJHS member, stand side by side for their picture.  These students are among such that enjoy ways to give back to their community.

Addy Bennett

On right, NJHS president Maggie Kenzler and Emily LaBatt, NJHS member, stand side by side for their picture. These students are among such that enjoy ways to give back to their community.

Addy Bennett, Columnist

Last week, science teacher Lisa Di Chiara passed out packets to middle school students with a GPA of 3.5 or higher that told of an organization called the National Junior Honor Society (NJHS).  I was among the crowd, and while it felt nice to qualify, I wasn’t all that interested.  But then I found out what NJHS, as it’s called, worked for.

In high school, community service is required of students, while in middle school it is much less so.  NJHS is built around the mindset that community service should be for all ages.  The club takes responsible students to visit nursing homes and help with the school day care, among other activities.

President of the Horizon Honors denomination, eighth grader Maggie Kenzler, feels that, “Being in NJHS is an honor, because people see you as a leader.”  I have to agree.  The experience will do middle schoolers good for when they become freshmen.

Students who have been chosen are highly encouraged to submit their packets to join.  NJHS is not just another club.  It’s a community: of students, of scholars, and most importantly, of people looking to give back to their community.